Friday, March 31, 2017

Dear Abby - How to Help a Choking Dog

Dear Friends,

I am here to talk about a serious topic this week.  I had a scare a couple of weeks ago and Momma said I should tell you about it here.

At night I get a crunchy biscuit before bedtime.  A couple of weeks ago Momma gave me my crunchy biscuit as she was unmaking the bed for the night.  I ran into the other room to enjoy it.  Moments later I returned and got up on the bed and acted very agitated.  I was pawing at my mouth and gagging.

Momma thought I was going to have an upset stomach, so she got down on the floor with me.  Unfortunately, this continued on the floor.  Momma looked in my mouth and discovered that the biscuit was lodged in my throat!   She said I was so excited about it that I evidently swallowed without chewing.  She was able to gently remove the biscuit, and all was well.  We were both VERY relieved!

But this changed things at my house.  Now my crunchy biscuit is broken into three parts, and I only get a treat when Momma is in the room.

And she has learned more about what to do when your pet is choking.

Here is a very good article with step by step information.  I would encourage dog people to read this and bookmark it:
WikiHow: How to Save a Choking Dog


This very short video from The Huffington Post even shows how to perform the Heimlich maneuver on a choking canine friend:


I hope you never, ever need this information, but I wanted to share just in case! 

If you have a dog, does he or she eat slowly or does your dog friend tend to swallow food and treats quickly?   (I am in the eager eater camp.)

I would love to hear from you in the comments, below.


Love,

Abby xoxoxo

Book Review - 1,001 Ways to Slow Down by Barbara Ann Kipfer

Book Synopsis
This irresistible list book from National Geographic provides lighthearted quick hits of inspiration for those of us who feel overwhelmed—which is to say, all of us. Musings, activity suggestions, and illuminating quotes are paired with whimsical art on themes such as living in the moment, achieving balance, relieving stress, developing patience, and appreciating the world around us. “Slow living” sidebars, such as “Foods to Cook Slowly” and “Things to Do the Old-Fashioned Way,” are interspersed throughout the book.

 

Purchase Links

National Geographic | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

 

My Review

1,001 Ways to Slow Down is a delight from start to finish.  First, this is a beautifully designed book.  It is a small hardcover with a blue and green abstract design that looks like ocean waves on the dustjacket.  The illustrations through the book, by Francesca Springolo, are also lovely.  They brighten the edges of the pages and also provide colorful borders for inspiring quotes.

 

In the introduction to the book, Barbara Ann Kipfer writes:  "Since sixth grade, I have been an ethnographer, making lists of the little things in life."   Although I did not know the term ethnographer before, I am also a lifelong list maker, and this book of lists fills me with delight.

 

There are literally 1,001 suggestions for slowing down in this book.  I found them inspiring, comforting, and challenging.  The suggestions include ideas like:

 

"Instead of getting agitated when you are stuck in traffic, think of this as a time to pause - a time when you cannot hurry" (p. 11).

 

"Create a jigsaw or word-search puzzle and send it to a friend" (p. 14).

 

"Walk like a three year old exploring the world" (p. 36).

 

"Put a note in a bottle and send it down a waterway" (p. 196).

 

As you can see from these examples, the suggestions in this book go beyond merely slowing down;  they also are tips for finding joy in small, simple things.

 

1,001 Ways to Slow Down also includes pages with inspiring quotes and (my favorite of all!) lists.  The lists in this book are a delight!  They include topics like:

 

Slow Movies to Savor

 

Relaxing Hobbies to Try

 

Handwritten Letters to Send

 

Meditations to Try

 

Things to Do the Old-Fashioned Way

 

If you have an interest in mindfulness or voluntary simplicity, or if you simply want to slow down and enjoy life more, you will love 1,001 Ways to Slow Down!  I know I did. 

 

Author Bio

Dr. Barbara Ann Kipfer is the author of 14,000 Things to Be Happy About and the Page-a-Day calendars based on it. She has written more than 60 books, including 1,001 Ways to Live Wild, The Order of Things, Self-Meditation, Instant Karma, 8,789 Words of Wisdom, The Wish List, and 4,000 Questions for Getting to Know Anyone and Everyone, and she edited Roget’s International Thesaurus. She holds PhDs in linguistics, archaeology, and Buddhist studies. Dr. Kipfer is the Chief Lexicographer of Temnos and has worked for such companies as Answers.com, Ask Jeeves, and Dictionary.com.

I received a copy of this book from TLC Book Tours.

Upcoming April Book Reviews and Spotlights

Hi all!

I am very excited about a great month of book reviews, spotlights, and giveaways ahead.  Here are the books you'll find featured at View from the Birdhouse in April:

The Forbidden Garden by Ellen Merrick (historical fiction in an old English garden)

Called to Justice by Edith Maxwell (historical mystery with a Quaker midwife)

The Women in the Castle by Jessica Shattuck (historical fiction set in World War II Bavaria)

The NKJV Woman's Study Bible

The Hideaway by Lauren K. Denton (women's fiction set in New Orleans)

Chasing Famous:  Living the Life You've Always Auditioned For by Lisa Lloyd (Christian nonfiction)

I hope you'll subscribe to email updates to learn more about these books when posts go up!  I may have a few surprise reviews, spotlights or giveaways during April as well.